in Puerto Rico, USA

What do the numbers of hospital in Puerto Rico mean?

We are looking at Acute Care and Critical Access Hospitals. We are not inlcuding Psychiatric Hospitals, Department of Defense or VA Hospitals. The number of hospitals is constant in Puerto Rico at 51. Hospitals are rated by CMS on a scale of one to five, five being the highest rating. A hospitals rating can become better or worse based on patient surveys and other reported quality measures. Note that not all hospitals will have a star rating.

We have taken a closer look at those CMS hospital ratings:

The number of hospitals with a five star rating has remained the same in Puerto Rico at 0. How about hospitals with a four star ratings improved? The number of hospitals with a 4 star rating has remained the same at 0.

And how about three star rated hospitals? The number of hospitals with a three star rating has remained the same.

Have the lower-rated hospitals in Puerto Rico changed?

The number of hospitals with a two star rating has remained the same at 3. There are 2 more hospitals with a two star rating in Puerto Rico than the previous year.

The directory of Hospitals of the States and Territories was last updated 1/30/2020.

About Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico[a] (Spanish for "Rich Port"; abbreviated PR), officially the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Spanish: Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico, lit."Free Associated State of Puerto Rico")[b] and briefly called Porto Rico, is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the northeast Caribbean Sea, approximately 1,000 miles (1,600 km) southeast of Miami, Florida.

An archipelago among the Greater Antilles, located between the Dominican Republic and the US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico includes the eponymous main island and several smaller islands, such as Mona, Culebra, and Vieques. The capital and most populous city is San Juan. The territory's total population is approximately 3.4 million. Spanish and English are the official languages of the executive branch of government, though Spanish predominates.

Puerto Ricans have been citizens of the United States since 1917, and enjoy freedom of movement between the island and the mainland. As it is not a state, Puerto Rico does not have a vote in the United States Congress, which governs the territory with full jurisdiction under the Puerto Rico Federal Relations Act of 1950. However, Puerto Rico does have one non-voting member of the House called a Resident Commissioner. As residents of a U.S. territory, American citizens in Puerto Rico are disenfranchised at the national level and do not vote for the president or vice president of the United States, and only some residents pay federal income tax. Like other territories and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico does not have U.S. senators. Congress approved a local constitution in 1952, allowing U.S. citizens of the territory to elect a governor. Puerto Rico's future political status has consistently been a matter of significant debate.

Source: Wikipedia